Sushirrito

With the growing number of places popping up in the bay that expose us to the sushi + burrito concept, we were thrilled to embark on a meal at the popularized trendsetter itself, Sushirrito. While we may have wanted to know what the difference between a regular sushi roll and a sushirrito was, the main thing that lured us in was the eye-catching pictures we saw all over the different social media platforms.

To our joy, this crowed eatery could be found in Palo Alto. While the rush hour traffic and the color coded parking lots closer by may seem slightly problematic at first, we found that the ample amounts of two hour street parking available a few blocks of away were enough of a solution. Not only did it save time, it allowed for a nice afternoon stroll from Palo Alto’s residential streets to that of its seemingly rustic downtown.

Decor

Before entering, similar to that of Ramen Dojo, Sushirrito had line barricades outside used to mediate the line. If there was ever a backlog of people out their door, it would allow others that were just trying to pass by to walk through. Since we went during lunchtime rush hour, I was confident that it would be of great benefit to the business, especially with Stanford campus being conveniently nearby.

Inside, there’s a long pathway that stretches to the ordering area, similar to that of Chipotle. Parallel to that were several tables, where I noticed people frequently sitting and leaving as finishing a sushirrito took a short period of time. As we walked closer to the servicing area, we can see the assembly area through several eye-level glass panes.

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Pathway inside

It was here that we witnessed them creating our order with a wide variety of fresh ingredients.

As we progressed through the line, we are met with three things: the end of the restaurant, the cash register, and the restrooms. Above this area, you can see an large version of their slick logo.

As more people are drawn closer and closer to Silicon Valley from the high tech boom, lines for popular fast food places grow longer. Thus, one important must for businesses is the speed for order outputs. Sushirrito does a great job at making their preparation process fast and efficient by using their custom machine that automates the seaweed sheet process. As the employees feed in a sheet of nori, they are reciprocated with an evenly rice-coated one.

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Machine they use in the background

Meal

We shared a sushi burrito, nachos, and a drink.

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Our meal

The sushi burrito we decided to get was the Satori ($13.00), as it was the lightest option out of all the non-vegetarian burritos. It was a simple sushi burrito with fresh ingredients such as the cucumber and corn. It complemented the fillet of yellowtail sashimi well. The ginger guacamole had an extremely smooth consistency by means of blending (if I were to speculate). Not only was it delicious to eat, it was also visually appealing as they always cut their burritos at a bias.

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Close up of the Satori sushi burrito

After finishing the Satori, we started on the Lava Nachos ($8.00), which I found was an interesting type of fusion. The chips were made from brown rice which, in a way, reminded me of those grain crackers you can get at Costco. Anyway, it was topped with tuna picante, which brought on a spicy component to the dish. Eating it with a bit of pepper jack cheese (my favorite kind), I thoroughly savored each bite. From the crunch to the subtle heat, the combination of textures and flavors surprisingly went well together. One thing to note for this dish is that they only have a limited supply of these everyday.

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A better angle of the lava nachos

Throughout our meal, we sipped on some Horchata Genmai ($3.00). My friend Jorge introduced me to horchata, and I have loved it since. The fusion of western and eastern flavors resulted in a delightfully indescribable taste. Go and try it yourself if you are curious.

Conclusion

I would deem our experience at Sushirrito a positive one. They have more interesting combinations (and names) for their sushi burritos and I would probably try the Geisha’s Kiss or Salmon Samba next. With fast service, you are almost guaranteed not to stay hungry for very long.

 

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